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Autogenous Tendon Grafting Effective for Extensor Tendon Reconstruction

  • Written by Will Boggs, MD
  • Category: Adult Surgery
Autogenous palmaris longus tendon grafting is effective for repairing ruptured extensor tendons in the wrist in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to a report in the April 24th Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research.

Read more: Autogenous Tendon Grafting Effective for Extensor Tendon Reconstruction

Teamwork Slashes Cardiac Surgery Wound Infection Rates

A multidisciplinary approach to maintaining optimal glycometabolism in cardiac surgery patients has led to an impressive reduction in deep sternal wound infection rates at one New England hospital.

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Similar Outcomes for Patients After Laparoscopic and Open Colorectal Cancer Resection

  • Written by Ramaz Mitaishvili
  • Category: Adult Surgery
Laparoscopic colorectal cancer resection and open colectomy provide similar long-term patients outcomes, according to a new report.

Read more: Similar Outcomes for Patients After Laparoscopic and Open Colorectal Cancer Resection

Rebleeding Often Occurs After Embolization of Gastroduodenal Hemorrhage

  • Written by Ramaz Mitaishvili
  • Category: Adult Surgery
Angiographic embolization for gastroduodenal hemorrhage can be achieved technically in most patients, but in-hospital rebleeding occurs in almost half of cases, researchers report in the May issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Read more: Rebleeding Often Occurs After Embolization of Gastroduodenal Hemorrhage

Blood Substitute Safely Reduces Need for Transfusion Following Elective Surgery

  • Written by Ramaz Mitaishvili
  • Category: Adult Surgery
A hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier (HBOC-201, Biopure Corporation) appears to be a safe substitute for blood transfusion, according to results of a multinational, phase III clinical trial among patients undergoing elective orthopedic surgery. However, the blood substitute may not be appropriate for high-risk patients and patients over the age of 80, the findings suggest.

Read more: Blood Substitute Safely Reduces Need for Transfusion Following Elective Surgery

Annual FIT Testing Detects Colorectal Cancer Two Years Earlier Than Colonoscopy Alone

  • Written by Ramaz Mitaishvili
  • Category: Adult Surgery
Annual FIT Testing Detects Colorectal Cancer Two Years Earlier Than Colonoscopy Alone, Study of High-Risk Population Finds
SAN DIEGO, May 20 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- An interim analysis of a study presented today at the 39th Annual Digestive Disease Week (DDW) Conference found that, among patients at increased risk for colorectal cancer who completed an annual fecal immunochemical (FIT) test, detection of cancerous lesions occurred an average of 26.5 months earlier than would have occurred during the three- or five-year study-required colonoscopy. Detection of precancerous lesions in this group occurred 18.4 months earlier.

Read more: Annual FIT Testing Detects Colorectal Cancer Two Years Earlier Than Colonoscopy Alone

Ischemic Preconditioning During the Use of the Percusurge Occlusion Balloon for Carotid Angioplast

  • Written by Peter L. Faries; Brian DeRubertis; Susan Trocciola; John Karwowski; K. Craig Kent; Rabih A. Chaer
  • Category: Adult Surgery
Abstract
Ischemic preconditioning (IP) uses transient ischemia to render tissues tolerant to subsequent, prolonged ischemia. This study sought to evaluate factors that contributed to the development of cerebral ischemia during PercuSurge balloon (Medtronic, Santa Rosa, CA) occlusion in patients undergoing carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS). The PercuSurge occlusion balloon was used in 43 of 165 patients treated with CAS for high-grade stenosis; 20% were symptomatic. Symptoms of cerebral hypoperfusion during temporary occlusion of the internal carotid artery occurred in 10 of 43 patients and included dysarthria, agitation, decreased level of consciousness, and focal hemispheric deficit. The development of neurologic symptoms after initial PercuSurge balloon inflation and occluded internal carotid artery flow was associated with a decrease in the mean Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) from 15 to 10 (range 9–14); the GCS returned to normal after occlusion balloon deflation. The mean time to spontaneous recovery of full neurologic function was 8 minutes (range 4–15 minutes). The mean subsequent procedure duration was 11.9 minutes (range 6–21 minutes). No recurrence of neurologic symptoms occurred when the occlusion balloon was reinflated. All 10 patients underwent successful CAS without occlusion, dissection, cerebrovascular accident, or death. Ischemic preconditioning can be used to enable CAS with embolic protection in patients who cannot tolerate initial interruption of antegrade cerebral perfusion by PercuSurge occlusion.

Read more: Ischemic Preconditioning During the Use of the Percusurge Occlusion Balloon for Carotid Angioplast

Bowel Tumor Resection Improves Outcomes in Unresectable Liver Metastases

  • Written by Ramaz Mitaishvili
  • Category: Adult Surgery
Bowel tumor resection before chemotherapy leads to better survival than first-line chemotherapy in patients with unresectable colorectal hepatic metastases, according to a report in the April issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Read more: Bowel Tumor Resection Improves Outcomes in Unresectable Liver Metastases

Does a Goiter Always Require Surgery?

  • Written by Albert Lowenfels, MD
  • Category: Adult Surgery
Fate of the non-operated, non-toxic goitre in a defined population

Winbladh A, Järhult J
Br J Surg. 2008;95:338-343

Summary
Does every patient with a benign goiter need surgery? To answer this question, the study authors reviewed data on 261 patients (median age, 56 years) who, at the time of clinical examination or after fine-needle aspiration (233 patients), did not wish or appear to need surgery. During a median follow-up period of 130 months, 36% of these patients had an additional surgical evaluation. Of the original group, 57 underwent surgery; 5 patients were diagnosed with thyroid cancer; and 13 developed thyrotoxicosis.

Read more: Does a Goiter Always Require Surgery?

Surgeon Sews for Fun, Sutures for a Living

  • Written by Nicholas Genes, MD, PhD
  • Category: Adult Surgery
Surgeons are known for the knots they tie. For Ramona Bates, that is doubly true: Not only is she a plastic surgeon, but she also has a passion for quilting. Lately she's been sharing her personal and professional interests at her Web site, Suture for a Living. I had the chance to correspond with Dr. Bates about the common threads between her work and hobbies.

Read more: Surgeon Sews for Fun, Sutures for a Living

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