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Therapeutic Specialties

AISER specializes in key therapeutic areas. This focus allows us to provide scientific expertise, operational excellence, and close alignment with our clients' goals.

Ramaz Miraishvili Research Fellow

New AHA Obesity Statement Urges Clinicians to Think Beyond Clinical Treatment and Prevention

  • Written by News Author: Shelley Wood CME Author: Désirée Lie, MD, MSEd
  • Category: Therapeutic Specialties
Think bigger: that's the thrust of the American Heart Association's (AHA) new scientific statement on obesity prevention [1]. To have any meaningful impact on the obesity epidemic, clinicians need to go beyond clinical prevention and treatments for obesity and use influence and advocacy to effect social and environmental change, authors of the statement say.

Read more: New AHA Obesity Statement Urges Clinicians to Think Beyond Clinical Treatment and Prevention

Increasing Global Surgery Volume Mandates Improved Safety, Availability

Surgery now occurs at a tremendous volume worldwide, resulting in a great need for public health efforts to improve the safety and availability of surgical services, according to the results of a study reported in The Lancet, published online June 25.

"Little is known about the amount and availability of surgical care globally," write Thomas G. Weiser, from the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, Massachusetts, and colleagues. "We estimated the number of major operations undertaken worldwide, described their distribution, and assessed the importance of surgical care in global public-health policy."

Read more: Increasing Global Surgery Volume Mandates Improved Safety, Availability

Outreach and Patient-Navigation Programs Improve Cancer Care

A new study shows that community-education and outreach initiatives can improve the stage at diagnosis in otherwise underserved patient populations. "This is exciting news," lead investigator Sheryl Gabram, MD, from Emory University and director of the Avon Comprehensive Breast Center at the Georgia Cancer Center for Excellence at Grady, in Atlanta, told Medscape Oncology. "Our program works and we have been very successful." The group's new study was published online June 23 in Cancer.

Read more: Outreach and Patient-Navigation Programs Improve Cancer Care

Poverty Boosts Mortality Risk After Cancer Diagnosis, Study Shows

Patients with low socioeconomic status have a higher death rate after a cancer diagnosis, report researchers. Could poverty be a risk factor for all-cause mortality? In a study published online June 23 in Cancer, investigators suggest that it is, and they attribute the higher death rate to later disease stage at diagnosis and less aggressive treatment.

Read more: Poverty Boosts Mortality Risk After Cancer Diagnosis, Study Shows

Evaluation of an Internet-Based Psychological Intervention for the Treatment of Erectile Dysfunctio

Abstract
Recent research on the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED) has focused on medical interventions, in particular oral medications. The current study examined the effectiveness of an internet-based psychological intervention for this condition. In total, 31 men (12 in treatment group, 19 in control group) completed the program. The results demonstrated that men who completed the program reported improved erectile functioning and sexual relationship satisfaction and quality. The implications of these findings for the treatment of ED are discussed.

Read more: Evaluation of an Internet-Based Psychological Intervention for the Treatment of Erectile Dysfunctio

Coffee and Tea May Protect Against Stroke

  • Written by News Author: Pauline Anderson CME Author: Charles Vega, MD
  • Category: Therapeutic Specialties
High consumption of coffee or tea every day appears to protect male smokers against at least 1 type of stroke, a new study suggests.

This large, prospective, observational study showed that Finnish smokers who consumed 8 or more cups of coffee per day had a 23% lowered risk for cerebral infarction, whereas those who drank 2 or more cups of black tea daily had a 21% lowered risk for this type of stroke vs those who drank little or none of these beverages. The associations were independent of risk factors such as a history of coronary heart disease.

Their report is published in the June 2008 issue of Stroke.

Read more: Coffee and Tea May Protect Against Stroke

Intensive Interventions Increase Walking Behavior

  • Written by News Author: Laurie Barclay, MD CME Author: Hien T. Nghiem, MD
  • Category: Therapeutic Specialties
Intensive interventions can increase walking behavior, according to the results of a review reported in the July issue of Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.

"Walking is the most prevalent and preferred method of physical activity for both work and leisure purposes, thus making it a prime target for physical activity promotion interventions," write David M. Williams, PhD, from Brown Medical School and The Miriam Hospital, Centers for Behavioral and Preventive Medicine, in Providence, Rhode Island, and colleagues. "Although researchers have made great strides in understanding the impact of physical activity on biological mechanisms that influence the natural history of chronic diseases, the current challenge is to continue to develop intervention programs that successfully target the psychological and the social–ecological mechanisms."

Read more: Intensive Interventions Increase Walking Behavior

Low-Risk Food Pattern May Reduce Risk for Diabetes

  • Written by News Author: Laurie Barclay, MD CME Author: Désirée Lie, MD, MSEd
  • Category: Therapeutic Specialties
Dietary patterns affect the risk for type 2 diabetes to a greater extent vs intake of specific food groups, according to findings from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), reported in the June 10 Online First issue of Diabetes Care.

Read more: Low-Risk Food Pattern May Reduce Risk for Diabetes

Post-MI Angina Common, Underappreciated, Undertreated in Registry Study

  • Written by News Author: Steve Stiles CME Author: Désirée Lie, MD, MSEd
  • Category: Therapeutic Specialties
One in five patients with a myocardial infarction (MI) experienced angina one year after hospitalization for the acute event, and a substantial minority of those with angina had symptoms at least weekly, in a prospective, multicenter registry analysis appearing in the June 23, 2008 Archives of Internal Medicine [1].

Read more: Post-MI Angina Common, Underappreciated, Undertreated in Registry Study

Coronary Calcium Better Than Carotid IMT for Predicting CVD Risk, MESA Analysis Shows

Coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores are better than carotid intima media thickness (IMT) at predicting risk of subsequent cardiovascular disease events, a new analysis from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) suggests [1]. While CAC was best at predicting risk of all cardiovascular disease or coronary heart disease specifically, carotid IMT was modestly better than CAC at predicting the risk of stroke, the research showed.

Read more: Coronary Calcium Better Than Carotid IMT for Predicting CVD Risk, MESA Analysis Shows

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